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Date:
Saturday, August 15, 2020
Time:
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM

 

Virtual Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning: "Tree of Life Motif"

Christine Brown, Independent Scholar

Saturday, August 15

11am EDT 

Join us online for a virtual edition of our Rug and Textile Appreciation Morning series. In this session, independent scholar Christine Brown, will lead a discussion on the tree of life motif and the accompanying design elements that differentiate it from a simple tree.

 

Very early on, and almost universally, trees became an iconic symbol of the universe. Representations of trees were incorporated into objects of importance within different cultures in a variety of media, including textiles of all kinds. Join independent scholar Christine Brown for a virtual discussion of the tree of life motif and the accompanying design elements that differentiate it from a simple tree. 


 

Special note on participant show-and-tell:

Many of our regular program attendees know that Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings typically include a show-and-tell of textiles brought in by program participants. In order to simulate this experience virtually, we invite you to submit high-resolution photographs of pieces from your personal collections that fit this program’s theme. Please send high-resolution images to us at MuseumEd@gwu.edu no later than Thursday, August  13 to be considered for inclusion in the program (keep in mind we may not be able to accommodate them all).

About the Speaker

Christine Brown earned a degree in anthropology, served as a Peace Corps volunteer in West Africa, and spent a career working on international development projects in Africa and Asia funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. These experiences gave her an enduring interest in the material culture of traditional societies around the world. Brown has co-curated three exhibitions of ethnic jewelry at the former Bead Museum in Washington, D.C., and lectured on textile-related topics at the Mingei International Museum, the Asian Arts Council in San Diego, and to textile collecting groups in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C.  


 

 

 

 

Online registration for this event has now closed.