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Click here for more information about DVD: Once in a Hundred Years: The Life & Legacy of Marian Anderson + CD: Marian Anderson: Let Freedom Ring!
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DVD: Once in a Hundred Years: The Life & Legacy of Marian Anderson + CD: Marian Anderson: Let Freedom Ring!
Celebrate the life and voice of Marian Anderson when you pledge for both the CD: Let Freedom Ring as well the DVD: Once in a Hundred Years: The Life & Legacy of Marian Anderson.

$180.00   

Click here for more information about DVD: Once in a Hundred Years: The Life & Legacy of Marian Anderson
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DVD: Once in a Hundred Years: The Life & Legacy of Marian Anderson
Marian Anderson (18971993) is considered one of the most important opera performers of the 20th century. The celebrated contralto was born in South Philadelphia on Feb. 27, 1897, and played a vital role in the acceptance of African Americans in classical music and other segregated performing arts genres. MARIAN ANDERSON: ONCE IN A HUNDRED YEARS traces the arc of Anderson's life and her struggles against racism and poverty. The program culminates with her battle against the Daughters of the American Revolution, which led to her historic concert at the Lincoln Memorial.

$120.00   

Click here for more information about CD: Marian Anderson: Let Freedom Ring! Concert at Lincoln Memorial + Concert in Copenhagen
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CD: Marian Anderson: Let Freedom Ring! Concert at Lincoln Memorial + Concert in Copenhagen
Born in 1897, Anderson's parents were cultured and supportive of their children. After her father's death, the family moved to Philadelphia. Anderson was 12. Unable to attend High School (her family was too poor), she pursued her musical ambitions through the church. Supported by the local community - her talent was obvious - she secured informal instruction after being rejected by the Philadelphia Music Academy. In 1925 she won First Prize in a competition organized by the New York Philharmonic. Her career evolved from there - especially in Europe where she was popular. By 1939 Marian Anderson was feted worldwide, but a concert planned for Washington's Constitution Hall was blocked for one reason: she was black. With Eleanor Roosevelt's support the concert took place instead on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. It was a triumph - now, perhaps, too little recalled. This release would be merited simply because it is music-making of the highest order, but this is more - it's an important piece of American history.The Copenhagen Concert is a further triumph. Held in especially high regard in Scandinavia (Sibelius adapted some of his works for her), Anderson basks in the audience's affection.

$96.00   

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